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Updated: 17 hours 18 min ago

OnePlus 7 Pro users report ‘ghost touches’ that occur without any input

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 18:04

It should be an exceptional week for OnePlus, considering the stellar response the OnePlus 7 Pro got after launch and the fact that the young smartphone vendor just launched its first ever 5G phone. However, OnePlus is already being forced to put out fires.OnePlus addressed criticism that it's misleading users with its 3x zoom claims earlier this week, but now, some users have discovered a more serious issue that might actually impact their overall experience, as this one concerns the sophisticated OnePlus 7 Pro display.The OnePlus 7 Pro features a brand new design, complete with an all-screen display that features no notches or holes. The screen is also curved on the sides, which will remind some people of Samsung's phones. But, more importantly, the Pro features a 90Hz display that doesn't have many rivals. What that means for users is that they should get an even better, smoother Android experience than on competing flagships.But it turns out that some OnePlus 7 Pro displays register ghost touches, which is as annoying as it sounds. As you can see in the following video, the display registers touches that don't actually happen, and reacts accordingly, producing the results you'd expect to see on the screen had you pressed the same buttons:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GT1U8ilxy4kThere's a thread on the matter over on the OnePlus forums, and Android Central confirms it's been able to replicate the issue on one of its test units:> It's only happened a couple of times in my four days with the handset so far, the first time in WhatsApp for about 5 seconds, not a big deal. The second time it happened, it lasted about 2 minutes and was affecting every app I was in, including the home screen. It makes navigating and typing on the keyboard incredibly difficult as the phone thinks you're tapping away on something else.It's unclear at this time what is causing the issue. Hopefully, it's not the hardware, in which case a software update should fix things. If you're experiencing similar issues, your best bet is to exchange yours for a new one.


AT&T is the first major US wireless carrier to let you pay via cryptocurrency

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 16:48

If you're an AT&T mobile customer, and you have some extra bitcoin lying around that you're not doing anything with, you can now use it to pay your phone bill.AT&T just became the first big US wireless carrier to announce that its customers can now use cryptocurrency to make payments, as greater acceptance of this digital medium of exchange can be seen at companies ranging from AT&T to cable provider Dish, which also lets its customers pay via cryptocurrency. Likewise, Facebook on Friday garnered headlines over a report that it's set to launch its own cryptocurrency for use on the social network early next year.About AT&T's move, all customers need to do is select the BitPay option at MyAT&T. BitPay is an Atlanta-based bitcoin payment service provider, and it's also worth noting: This is an option that only currently works online and via the myAT&T app, so it's not as yet available for in-store payments."We're always looking for ways to improve and expand our services," said Kevin McDorman, vice president, AT&T Communications Finance Business Operations, in a statement about the new payment option. "We have customers who use cryptocurrency, and we are happy we can offer them a way to pay their bills with the method they prefer."There are of course a slew of different cryptocurrency options out there, and AT&T's announcement doesn't specify a particular kind. BitPay's website, though, notes that currencies it supports include Bitcoin, Gemini USD, and Paxos, to name a few.As of now, it's a safe bet to assume that crypto payments will probably remain a small minority of AT&T's customer payment mix for the near future. That's thanks to everything from the general public's unfamiliarity with the digital asset to obstacles like its fees and high volatility, the latter being two of the most frequent criticisms you hear.Still, expect to keep hearing more announcements like this as companies keep experimenting. Just a few weeks ago, for example, retailers like Whole Foods and GameStop likewise announced they'll be getting in on the act too, accepting cryptocurrency through the Flexa payment network.


Modi plots course after landslide Indian election win

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 15:57

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi met allies and former mentors Friday to plot a course for his second term after a landslide victory left the once-mighty Gandhi dynasty reeling. A considerable to-do list includes addressing India's lacklustre economic growth and reducing unemployment, as well as fixing a stricken agriculture sector on which 70 percent of households depend. Modi's Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) won 303 seats, its best ever score, giving it an even bigger majority than five years ago and defying predictions of a dip, final results confirmed Friday.


The Latest: Police defend Facebook likes deal with fugitive

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 15:52

TORRINGTON, Conn. (AP) — The Latest on the Facebook fugitive (all times local):


ACLU, Planned Parenthood Sue Alabama over Abortion Bill

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 13:06

Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union filed a federal lawsuit on Friday seeking to halt the implementation of a new Alabama law -- perhaps the most restrictive of its kind in the nation -- that bans abortions except in cases where the life of the mother is threatened.The Alabama ban conflicts with Roe v. Wade, the seminal 1973 Supreme Court case that affirmed the constitutional right of women to procure abortions, the lawsuit said, and is hence unenforceable. The plaintiffs write that the law will cause "immediate and irreparable harm" to women seeking an abortion by "forcing them to continue their pregnancies to term against their will."“The Alabama legislature has been pushing abortion care further and further out of reach for years with medically unnecessary and politically-motivated restrictions, and this extreme abortion ban shows us just how far they’ll go to push their anti-abortion agenda,” read a statement from senior ACLU staff attorney Alexa Kolbi-Molinas."Along with our partners at ACLU Alabama, we just filed a lawsuit, challenging Alabama's outright abortion ban. We meant it when we said we'd see you in court, Governor Kay Ivey," Planned Parenthood wrote on Twitter.Ivey, Alabama's Republican governor, signed the Human Life Protection Act earlier this month amid extensive media coverage and a firestorm of protests from abortion advocates. The law bans all abortions, with an exception only for those cases where "abortion is necessary in order to prevent a serious health risk" to the mother. It makes doctors who perform an abortion subject to up to 99 years in prison, but does not include punishments for women who undergo the procedure.Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Dakota, and Ohio have also passed strict abortion bans, some of which are currently tied up in the courts. The measures are intended to spark legal challenges that would ultimately leave the issue in the hands of the new, conservative Supreme Court majority.


Facebook accused of leaving 'broken children' in wake of its commercial aims, abuse inquiry hears

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 12:26

Facebook has been accused of leaving 'broken children' as collateral damage in the wake of their commercial aims, the child sex abuse inquiry has heard. Barrister William Chapman, representing the victims of abuse at the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA), said social media companies were not preventing paedophiles reaching children as it was “contrary to their business model” and that their apps needed to be “fundamentally redesigned”. Police also warned that tech firms were going ahead with plans to encrypt more features "in the certain knowledge" it would lead to more children being abused. The warnings came as the inquiry’s hearing into online child abuse drew to a close yesterday. Over the last fortnight IICSA has heard evidence from Facebook, Apple, Microsoft and Google about their efforts to combat child abuse online. Giving his closing statement, Mr Chapman singled out Facebook as the “unacceptable face of social media”, citing that over half of reported grooming offences in 2017 and 2018 related to the company or its Instagram and WhatsApp apps. William Chapman giving his closing address to the inquiry He said that social networks scanned for evidence of abuse after it happened and that they now needed to change their business model to stop abusers easily contacting children. Mr Chapman said: “What they will not do, because it is contrary to their business model, is to restrict the opportunities for abuse before it takes place.” He added: “They leave behind broken children like so much collateral damage. “Money, they say, is no object but none you heard from has a dedicated budget to tackling this problem.” Among the recommendations being made to the inquiry on behalf of victims are for tech companies pay compensation to those abused via their services and that a new criminal offence be made of posing online as a child online without a reasonable excuse. Mr Chapman also accused tech companies of not giving the inquiry a “straight answer” about the scale of abuse on their sites and selectively releasing figures without context. Earlier in the hearing Microsoft failed to provide figures for how many children had been groomed on its live chat services Xbox Live and Skype and Facebook was similarly unable to say how many registered sex offenders had been caught using its services. “It is not acceptable to hide the extent of the problem on your platform in a black box out of which you prick pinholes for others to see only hints of the full horror within," said Mr Chapman. Later in the hearing, Debra Powell QC, speaking for the National Police Chiefs Council, warned that tech giants' plans to make ever more services encrypted would lead to more children being abused. Last month Facebook announced plans to add end-to-end encryption to its 1.3 billion-user Messenger service, meaning not even it will be able to see the content of messages. Ms Powell said: “Currently many technology companies are building in and offering to their users ever greater privacy protections, including end-to-end encryption, in the certain knowledge that this will make the detection and prevention of child sexual abuse and exploitation more difficult. “The inevitable result must be that more children will be abused and exploited and that their ordeals will go on for longer before the perpetrators can be caught, if they are caught at all.”


This Is the Fateful Decision That Led to Theresa May's Downfall

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 10:59

The date was June 9, 2017


Is the stock market closed for Memorial Day?

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 10:52

U.S. stock and bond markets are closed on Monday to observe Memorial Day. Foreign financial markets will be open.


Oman says it is trying to reduce US-Iran tensions

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 10:00

Oman said Friday it was trying to reduce spiralling tensions between the Unites States and Iran, as the Pentagon confirmed it was considering deploying more troops to the region. The small but strategically located sultanate, which faces Iran across the highly sensitive Strait of Hormuz at the entrance to the Gulf, has maintained good relations with Tehran throughout successive regional crises. "We and other parties seek to calm tensions between Washington and Tehran," Muscat's state minister for foreign affairs Yusuf bin Alawi bin Abdullah said in a statement.


Chinese carriers seek compensation for Boeing 737 Max groundings

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 07:55

China's official airline association said Friday it will help 13 member carriers seek compensation from Boeing for losses already approaching $580 million due to the grounding of the 737 MAX 8. "As time passes by, related losses will further increase," the China Air Transport Association said in a statement. On March 11, China became the first country to ground the 737 MAX, a day after a deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airways Boeing 737 MAX that killed all 157 people on board.


Download these 5 apps before your next trip

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 07:30

There are millions of apps available for your phone, but you can't take all of them on your next trip. So which travel apps should you pack?


Trump grants William Barr full access to state secrets for review of Russian interference investigation

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 05:02

President Donald Trump has granted Attorney General William Barr “full and complete authority” to declassify government secrets, issuing a memorandum late on Thursday that orders US intelligence agencies to co-operate promptly with Barr’s audit of the investigation into Russia’s election interference in 2016.The president’s move gives General Barr broad powers to unveil carefully guarded intelligence secrets about the Russia investigation, which the attorney general requested to allow him to quickly carry out his review, according to the memo.“Today’s action will ensure that all Americans learn the truth about the events that occurred, and the actions that were taken, during the last presidential election and will restore confidence in our public institutions,” the White House said in an accompanying statement, which Mr Trump then tweeted.The president has labelled the investigation of his campaign a “political witch hunt”.His Republican allies in Congress who have reviewed some of the related files argue that the FBI investigation was opened based on flimsy and questionable evidence of wrongdoing, and that surveillance of campaign advisers to Mr Trump was improper.“This is candidly part of the president wanting to make sure the American people have the entire story of what went on and what will be construed by most people as improper activity within the FBI.It’s also the very first step in rectifying and repairing the damage done by certain people at the FBI,” said Mark Meadows, one of the president’s biggest defenders on Capitol Hill.Mr Meadows said he discussed with the president how granting General Barr this authority would provide answers about whether the investigation was biased.Conservative lawmakers, such as Mr Meadows, have insisted to friends in the administration that declassifying these documents will help Mr Trump protect his presidency and further distance himself from any political fallout from the Russia investigation, according to multiple people involved in those discussions.The move is likely to further anger Democrats who have said that Mr Barr is using his position as the nation’s top law enforcement official to aggressively protect the president and attack his critics.Adam Schiff, who as chairman of the House Intelligence Committee leads one of the ongoing congressional investigations of President Trump, called the action “un-American”.President Trump and Mr Barr, Mr Schiff said in a statement on Thursday night, are conspiring to “weaponise law enforcement and classified information against their political enemies”. ‬The president is the government’s highest authority over whether national secrets remain classified.His order gives Mr Barr significant authority over agencies that typically hold their secrets close and don’t declassify them easily.While the memo states Mr Barr should consult with the head of an agency before declassifying its secrets, it also demands that he get prompt responses and documents from the intelligence community.Jeremy Bash, a former chief of staff at the CIA during the Obama administration, warned that, with his directive, President Trump was entering “dangerous territory”.“Stripping the intelligence leaders of their ability to control information about sources and methods, and handing that power to political actors, could cause human agents to question whether their identity will be protected,” Mr Bash said.General Barr has tapped John Durham, the US attorney for the District of Connecticut, to investigate the origins of the Russia probe.Separately, the Justice Department inspector general is examining the handling of various aspects of the case. Mr Barr has said the inspector general’s work is expected to be completed in May or June.President Trump’s memo highlights how much he has grown to trust Mr Barr.Mr Barr has said “spying” was conducted by the government against the Trump campaign – an accusation Trump has levelled repeatedly but that current and former FBI officials have denied.Mr Barr has been criticised by former FBI director James Comey and other former law enforcement officials for using the phrase “spying” to discuss how investigators monitored some Trump campaign advisers who had extensive contacts with Russians.His critics argue that General Barr is parroting the president’s loaded wording, when surveillance was a proper part of a counterintelligence investigation looking at whether Russians were trying to influence Mr Trump’s campaign aides.The Washington Post


CORRECTED-London's FTSE gains, led by miners; Mothercare surges

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 03:39

Britain's main index firmed on Friday, helped by strong gains in mining heavyweights, while retailer Mothercare jumped after it reported a narrower annual loss and a lower debt burden. The FTSE 100 was 0.5% higher by 0720 GMT while more domestically-focused midcaps were up 0.6%. Mothercare was the standout across UK indexes, up 19.1% to be on course for its best day in a year after its annual report showed restructuring efforts were paying off.


McAleenan: We need to address issue of families crossing the border

Thu, 05/23/2019 - 22:28

Acting DHS Secretary Kevin McAleenan discusses the ongoing immigration crisis at the border on 'The Ingraham Angle.'


In new charges against Assange, groups see cause for concern

Thu, 05/23/2019 - 21:43

WASHINGTON (AP) — New charges filed against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange quickly drew alarm Thursday from media organizations and others. The groups are concerned that the Justice Department is charging Assange for actions that ordinary journalists do routinely in their jobs.


Trump moves to escalate investigation of intel agencies

Thu, 05/23/2019 - 21:13

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump directed the U.S. intelligence community on Thursday to "quickly and fully cooperate" with Attorney General William Barr's investigation of the origins of the multi-year probe of whether his 2016 campaign colluded with Russia.


Huawei needs Google’s Android and Microsoft’s Windows 10 like fish need water

Thu, 05/23/2019 - 19:06

The import ban the Trump administration imposed on Huawei a few days ago was the next logical step in the trade war against China. While some people may have foreseen it, given the ZTE practice run from before, it still sent shockwaves through the industry. Huawei is prepared to fight, even as numerous business partners from the US and other countries confirm they're putting their business dealings with the Chinese giant on hold.One of the things Huawei confirmed earlier this week is that it'll move forward with an operating system of its own, which we'll call Huawei OS for lack of a better alternative, and which could launch as early as fall. That operating system is based on Android, and it's supposed to run both on smartphones and tablets. But, make no mistake, Huawei needs Google's version of Android and Microsoft's Windows 10, no matter what.Huawei might be in a hard place right now, but things will work out one way or the other. With the ban in place, it's not just Huawei that loses, but US and international companies as well. That said, Huawei will probably want to be more prepared in the future, which is why it makes sense to see it launch an operating system of its own.Huawei OS, however, only has a chance to catch on over in China, where Google doesn't have a presence, and where Huawei could easily make an Android of its own. Convincing smartphone users in Western markets to ditch a phone with Google's Android, on the other hand, will be an uphill battle. Huawei doesn't have alternatives to Google's apps, especially the Google Play Store, not to mention other popular services like YouTube, Gmail, and Google Maps.The same thing goes for Windows 10. Good luck trying to replace Windows 10 on Huawei laptops in Europe, the US, or anywhere else where Windows is still popular -- which is pretty much everywhere.But that's not the only reason why Huawei can't afford to lose its licenses with Google and Microsoft. In addition to the operating systems, these two firms bring Huawei the credibility they desperately need in Western countries. There's no better way to fight the US government's claims that Huawei hardware isn't as secure than having strong partners in companies such as Google, Microsoft, and Intel vouch for the security of your devices.Google's Sebastien Missoffe and Bob Borchers, Microsoft's Kurt Petersen, or Intel's Christian Morales and Chris Walker are just a few of the top execs who appeared on stage during Huawei's product launch events in recent years. Huawei didn't just invite them to talk about the product that was about to be unveiled, but also to send a clear message that these US tech titans trust the Chinese company. In turn, these companies would not have attended the events if that weren't the case. Add to that the marketing clips that Huawei aired ahead of some of its press conferences, featuring carrier partners from various countries that sell Huawei products, and it's clear that Huawei has been desperately trying to make it clear to consumers that they will be safe when using Huawei devices.That doesn't mean the US government is wrong to assert that Huawei may have closer ties to the Chinese government than intelligence agencies would want. Or that you should be careful when trusting any company with your private data.But knowing that Huawei's phones and laptops run the latest versions of Android and Windows 10, complete with regular security updates, should put your mind at ease. The alternative -- running a Huawei OS that can't be defended as vigorously and independently as Android and Windows when it comes to security and privacy -- might not sound great to tech-savvy buyers in Western countries looking to spend top dollar on hardware. And that's why Huawei will have to do whatever it takes to keep its Android and Windows 10 deals in place for as long as possible. Huawei OS alone won't cut it.There's also the argument that both Google and Microsoft, and all the other companies who just cut ties with Huawei, don't like the import ban. But that doesn't change the fact that Huawei can't just distance itself from the world's top operating systems, no matter how great Huawei OS might be.


Trump Justice Department Crosses New Line, Charges Assange With Publishing U.S. Secrets

Thu, 05/23/2019 - 18:34

Daniel Leal-Olivas/GettyIn a stunning escalation of the Trump administration’s war on the press, the Justice Department has indicted WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for revealing government secrets under the Espionage Act. It’s the first time a publisher has been charged under the World War I-era law.The indictment charges Assange with 16 counts of receiving or disclosing material leaked by then-Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning in 2009 and 2010. The charges invoke broad provisions of the Espionage Act that make it a crime to disclose or retain any defense information knowing it “could be used to injure” the U.S. The act has no exception for reporters or publishers, but prior administrations have balked at invoking the law against journalists for fear of colliding with the First Amendment. The Justice Department immediately sought to draw a distinction between Assange and the press in a briefing for reporters announcing the new indictment.“The department takes seriously the role of journalists in our democracy and we thank you for it,” said John Demers, head of the department’s National Security Division. “It has not and never has been the department’s policy to target them for reporting. But Julian Assange is no journalist.” Demers cited WikiLeaks’ publication of the names of U.S. government sources, saying it endangered people in China, Iran, and Syria.WikiLeaks on Twitter called the prosecution “the end of national security journalism and the First Amendment.”Assange is currently serving an 11-month sentence in the U.K. for jumping bail in a Swedish rape investigation, while the U.S. pushes its request to extradite him to the United States on computer hacking charges revealed in April. He was kicked out of the Ecuadorian embassy in London that month after taking refuge there from authorities for seven years. The leaked documents comprised 250,000 State Department cables, 90,000 Army field reports from Afghanistan and 400,000 from Iraq, and 800 detainee assessment briefs from Guantanamo Bay. Assange released most of that material without redaction, and the new indictment claims that the U.S. sources identified in the leaks were put in harm’s way as a result. “By publishing these documents without redacting the human sources’ names or other identifying information, Assange created a grave and imminent risk that the innocent people he named would suffer serious physical harm and/or arbitrary detention,” the indictment alleges. He is also charged with two counts of conspiracy for allegedly working with Manning to violate the Espionage Act and the anti-hacking Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. The FBI and federal prosecutors in Alexandria, Virginia, first began investigating Assange in 2010 and amassed a wealth of internal WikiLeaks chats and documents from informants and subpoenas. But the Obama administration was reluctant to indict Assange. A former senior Justice Department official told The Daily Beast last month that the Trump administration saw Assange’s case as a way to pursue its war on leaks. “There was renewed interest under the new administration to revisit issues of what qualifies as the media and to look back at the Assange case,” said Mary McCord, who was acting head of DOJ’s National Security Division. Despite the barrage of leaks in the years following the Manning disclosures, there were signs as early as 2017 that the Justice Department was still focused on the leaks that first put WikiLeaks on the map. A witness at the grand jury proceedings that produced Thursday’s indictment told The Daily Beast that prosecutors were specifically probing Assange’s reluctance to redact his leaks for any reason.“They showed me chat logs in which I was arguing vehemently with him about releasing documents that would leave people vulnerable and put people’s lives at risk,” said David House, a former WikiLeaks volunteer, in an interview last March. “That was the only thing they put in front of my face that made me think, ‘This may be what they’re going after him for.’”No U.S. sources are known to have come to harm as a result of the leaks, likely in part because of a massive remediation effort launched in the weeks before Assange published the material. The indictment takes pains to distinguish WikiLeaks from conventional journalism outfits in other ways as well, quoting Assange’s own description of his site as an “intelligence agency of the people” and lingering on Assange’s chats with Manning in which he encouraged and guided the soldier in the leaking. It also claims Manning deliberately sought out military secrets that were listed on a “most wanted leaks” section on WikiLeaks’ website.None of this is strictly relevant to the Espionage Act. If the Justice Department included these details to make the Assange prosecution more palatable to journalists and free speech advocates, it’s not working.  “Any government use of the Espionage Act to criminalize the receipt and publication of classified information poses a dire threat to journalists,” said Bruce Brown, executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press in a statement.  “This is an extraordinary escalation of the Trump administration’s attacks on journalism, and a direct assault on the First Amendment,” said the ACLU’s Ben Wizner. “It establishes a dangerous precedent that can be used to target all news organizations that hold the government accountable by publishing its secrets.”How Assange Could Beat the U.S. and Stay Out of JailRead more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. 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The Latest: Trump says Lindh will be watched closely

Thu, 05/23/2019 - 17:29

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) — The Latest on John Walker Lindh's release from prison (all times local):


Republicans encourage nationwide support for Alabama abortion ban, document reveals

Thu, 05/23/2019 - 16:30

A document containing approved Republican talking points regarding Alabama’s near-total abortion ban has been uncovered.The ban is set to go into effect in 2020 and multiple members of the state legislature have said that overturning Roe v Wade is the intention of the ban.Entitled “Messaging in the Minority,” the document was produced on Wednesday by the Republican Study Committee, a caucus of House Republicans, and obtained by Vice News. It offers “messaging guidance” on the GOP’s anti-abortion platform, and is labelled as “strictly OFF-THE-RECORD.” Vice News did not say how the document was obtained.The document instructs Republicans to insist that abortion is "murder," and "traumatic" for the person undergoing the operation. The document does not offer statistics, sources, or seemingly any research or resources at all to back its claims. It appears to offer a guideline to talk around comparatively moderate Republicans, who have called the ban extreme. Randall Marshall, executive director of the ACLU of Alabama, told The Independent that the organisation will file a lawsuit against the ban, alongside Planned Parenthood, soon. He expects the case to take at least three years, based on past experiences, but stressed that abortion would remain legal in Alabama for now.Mr Marshall has been with the ACLU of Alabama for six years, and says that since his first week, "at least one if not two" abortion access cases have been on their books at all times. The difference between previous tactics and now, he says, is the bluntness of the bans.“For years, these same folks who offered up this bill came up with restrictions and they said, it's all about women's health,” Mr Marshall said. “This now lays bear the lie that they've been telling for years now. This isn't about women’s health at all; this is about controlling choices.”Non-legislative groups are also pushing for stricter laws. NPR was given access to a letter written by a coalition of anti-abortion groups led by Students for Life. The letter asks Republican leadership to "reconsider decades-old talking points" regarding rape and incest, in hopes of backing laws like Alabama’s.Students for Life president Kristan Hawkins, who is herself not a student, told NPR that she thinks now is the time to “start having the conversation.”Alexa Kolbi-Molinas, a senior staff attorney at ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project, told The Independent that polling suggests otherwise. “These extreme bans are actually really totally out of touch with what Americans feel these days,” Miss Kolbi-Molinas said of the 14 bans restricting access to abortion currently sweeping the nation. “Polling shows us that the majority of Americans think abortion should be safe, legal, and supported.”Still, with support from the highest offices trickling down, there’s a strong determination on the right to back near-total abortion bans, even when they ignore women’s health, physically and emotionally, entirely. On the left, no matching strategy of unification on abortion access has emerged. The Democrats have not responded to a request for comment on when or if such a plan might take shape.


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