Feed aggregator

OnePlus 7 Pro users report ‘ghost touches’ that occur without any input

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 18:04

It should be an exceptional week for OnePlus, considering the stellar response the OnePlus 7 Pro got after launch and the fact that the young smartphone vendor just launched its first ever 5G phone. However, OnePlus is already being forced to put out fires.OnePlus addressed criticism that it's misleading users with its 3x zoom claims earlier this week, but now, some users have discovered a more serious issue that might actually impact their overall experience, as this one concerns the sophisticated OnePlus 7 Pro display.The OnePlus 7 Pro features a brand new design, complete with an all-screen display that features no notches or holes. The screen is also curved on the sides, which will remind some people of Samsung's phones. But, more importantly, the Pro features a 90Hz display that doesn't have many rivals. What that means for users is that they should get an even better, smoother Android experience than on competing flagships.But it turns out that some OnePlus 7 Pro displays register ghost touches, which is as annoying as it sounds. As you can see in the following video, the display registers touches that don't actually happen, and reacts accordingly, producing the results you'd expect to see on the screen had you pressed the same buttons:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GT1U8ilxy4kThere's a thread on the matter over on the OnePlus forums, and Android Central confirms it's been able to replicate the issue on one of its test units:> It's only happened a couple of times in my four days with the handset so far, the first time in WhatsApp for about 5 seconds, not a big deal. The second time it happened, it lasted about 2 minutes and was affecting every app I was in, including the home screen. It makes navigating and typing on the keyboard incredibly difficult as the phone thinks you're tapping away on something else.It's unclear at this time what is causing the issue. Hopefully, it's not the hardware, in which case a software update should fix things. If you're experiencing similar issues, your best bet is to exchange yours for a new one.


AT&T is the first major US wireless carrier to let you pay via cryptocurrency

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 16:48

If you're an AT&T mobile customer, and you have some extra bitcoin lying around that you're not doing anything with, you can now use it to pay your phone bill.AT&T just became the first big US wireless carrier to announce that its customers can now use cryptocurrency to make payments, as greater acceptance of this digital medium of exchange can be seen at companies ranging from AT&T to cable provider Dish, which also lets its customers pay via cryptocurrency. Likewise, Facebook on Friday garnered headlines over a report that it's set to launch its own cryptocurrency for use on the social network early next year.About AT&T's move, all customers need to do is select the BitPay option at MyAT&T. BitPay is an Atlanta-based bitcoin payment service provider, and it's also worth noting: This is an option that only currently works online and via the myAT&T app, so it's not as yet available for in-store payments."We're always looking for ways to improve and expand our services," said Kevin McDorman, vice president, AT&T Communications Finance Business Operations, in a statement about the new payment option. "We have customers who use cryptocurrency, and we are happy we can offer them a way to pay their bills with the method they prefer."There are of course a slew of different cryptocurrency options out there, and AT&T's announcement doesn't specify a particular kind. BitPay's website, though, notes that currencies it supports include Bitcoin, Gemini USD, and Paxos, to name a few.As of now, it's a safe bet to assume that crypto payments will probably remain a small minority of AT&T's customer payment mix for the near future. That's thanks to everything from the general public's unfamiliarity with the digital asset to obstacles like its fees and high volatility, the latter being two of the most frequent criticisms you hear.Still, expect to keep hearing more announcements like this as companies keep experimenting. Just a few weeks ago, for example, retailers like Whole Foods and GameStop likewise announced they'll be getting in on the act too, accepting cryptocurrency through the Flexa payment network.


Modi plots course after landslide Indian election win

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 15:57

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi met allies and former mentors Friday to plot a course for his second term after a landslide victory left the once-mighty Gandhi dynasty reeling. A considerable to-do list includes addressing India's lacklustre economic growth and reducing unemployment, as well as fixing a stricken agriculture sector on which 70 percent of households depend. Modi's Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) won 303 seats, its best ever score, giving it an even bigger majority than five years ago and defying predictions of a dip, final results confirmed Friday.


The Latest: Police defend Facebook likes deal with fugitive

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 15:52

TORRINGTON, Conn. (AP) — The Latest on the Facebook fugitive (all times local):


iFixit tears down the 2019 MacBook Pro, details butterfly keyboard changes

Macworld - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 13:13

Earlier this week, Apple refreshed its MacBook Pro lineup, boosting performance with the latest Intel processors but making no other significant changes.

Except one: There’s now another revision of the infamous “butterfly” keyboard mechanism, using new materials in a bid to further improve reliability. To go along with this new design, Apple extended the keyboard repair and replacement program to include virtually any Mac laptop with the butterfly keyboard (including the new ones), offering free repair for up to four years.

To read this article in full, please click here

ACLU, Planned Parenthood Sue Alabama over Abortion Bill

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 13:06

Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union filed a federal lawsuit on Friday seeking to halt the implementation of a new Alabama law -- perhaps the most restrictive of its kind in the nation -- that bans abortions except in cases where the life of the mother is threatened.The Alabama ban conflicts with Roe v. Wade, the seminal 1973 Supreme Court case that affirmed the constitutional right of women to procure abortions, the lawsuit said, and is hence unenforceable. The plaintiffs write that the law will cause "immediate and irreparable harm" to women seeking an abortion by "forcing them to continue their pregnancies to term against their will."“The Alabama legislature has been pushing abortion care further and further out of reach for years with medically unnecessary and politically-motivated restrictions, and this extreme abortion ban shows us just how far they’ll go to push their anti-abortion agenda,” read a statement from senior ACLU staff attorney Alexa Kolbi-Molinas."Along with our partners at ACLU Alabama, we just filed a lawsuit, challenging Alabama's outright abortion ban. We meant it when we said we'd see you in court, Governor Kay Ivey," Planned Parenthood wrote on Twitter.Ivey, Alabama's Republican governor, signed the Human Life Protection Act earlier this month amid extensive media coverage and a firestorm of protests from abortion advocates. The law bans all abortions, with an exception only for those cases where "abortion is necessary in order to prevent a serious health risk" to the mother. It makes doctors who perform an abortion subject to up to 99 years in prison, but does not include punishments for women who undergo the procedure.Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Dakota, and Ohio have also passed strict abortion bans, some of which are currently tied up in the courts. The measures are intended to spark legal challenges that would ultimately leave the issue in the hands of the new, conservative Supreme Court majority.


Facebook accused of leaving 'broken children' in wake of its commercial aims, abuse inquiry hears

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 12:26

Facebook has been accused of leaving 'broken children' as collateral damage in the wake of their commercial aims, the child sex abuse inquiry has heard. Barrister William Chapman, representing the victims of abuse at the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA), said social media companies were not preventing paedophiles reaching children as it was “contrary to their business model” and that their apps needed to be “fundamentally redesigned”. Police also warned that tech firms were going ahead with plans to encrypt more features "in the certain knowledge" it would lead to more children being abused. The warnings came as the inquiry’s hearing into online child abuse drew to a close yesterday. Over the last fortnight IICSA has heard evidence from Facebook, Apple, Microsoft and Google about their efforts to combat child abuse online. Giving his closing statement, Mr Chapman singled out Facebook as the “unacceptable face of social media”, citing that over half of reported grooming offences in 2017 and 2018 related to the company or its Instagram and WhatsApp apps. William Chapman giving his closing address to the inquiry He said that social networks scanned for evidence of abuse after it happened and that they now needed to change their business model to stop abusers easily contacting children. Mr Chapman said: “What they will not do, because it is contrary to their business model, is to restrict the opportunities for abuse before it takes place.” He added: “They leave behind broken children like so much collateral damage. “Money, they say, is no object but none you heard from has a dedicated budget to tackling this problem.” Among the recommendations being made to the inquiry on behalf of victims are for tech companies pay compensation to those abused via their services and that a new criminal offence be made of posing online as a child online without a reasonable excuse. Mr Chapman also accused tech companies of not giving the inquiry a “straight answer” about the scale of abuse on their sites and selectively releasing figures without context. Earlier in the hearing Microsoft failed to provide figures for how many children had been groomed on its live chat services Xbox Live and Skype and Facebook was similarly unable to say how many registered sex offenders had been caught using its services. “It is not acceptable to hide the extent of the problem on your platform in a black box out of which you prick pinholes for others to see only hints of the full horror within," said Mr Chapman. Later in the hearing, Debra Powell QC, speaking for the National Police Chiefs Council, warned that tech giants' plans to make ever more services encrypted would lead to more children being abused. Last month Facebook announced plans to add end-to-end encryption to its 1.3 billion-user Messenger service, meaning not even it will be able to see the content of messages. Ms Powell said: “Currently many technology companies are building in and offering to their users ever greater privacy protections, including end-to-end encryption, in the certain knowledge that this will make the detection and prevention of child sexual abuse and exploitation more difficult. “The inevitable result must be that more children will be abused and exploited and that their ordeals will go on for longer before the perpetrators can be caught, if they are caught at all.”


This Is the Fateful Decision That Led to Theresa May's Downfall

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 10:59

The date was June 9, 2017


Is the stock market closed for Memorial Day?

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 10:52

U.S. stock and bond markets are closed on Monday to observe Memorial Day. Foreign financial markets will be open.


Oman says it is trying to reduce US-Iran tensions

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 10:00

Oman said Friday it was trying to reduce spiralling tensions between the Unites States and Iran, as the Pentagon confirmed it was considering deploying more troops to the region. The small but strategically located sultanate, which faces Iran across the highly sensitive Strait of Hormuz at the entrance to the Gulf, has maintained good relations with Tehran throughout successive regional crises. "We and other parties seek to calm tensions between Washington and Tehran," Muscat's state minister for foreign affairs Yusuf bin Alawi bin Abdullah said in a statement.


Chinese carriers seek compensation for Boeing 737 Max groundings

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 07:55

China's official airline association said Friday it will help 13 member carriers seek compensation from Boeing for losses already approaching $580 million due to the grounding of the 737 MAX 8. "As time passes by, related losses will further increase," the China Air Transport Association said in a statement. On March 11, China became the first country to ground the 737 MAX, a day after a deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airways Boeing 737 MAX that killed all 157 people on board.


Download these 5 apps before your next trip

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 07:30

There are millions of apps available for your phone, but you can't take all of them on your next trip. So which travel apps should you pack?


What we won’t see at WWDC 2019

Macworld - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 07:00

Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference is still more than a week away, and as usual the internet is rife with posts predicting what we’ll see—or what people would like to see (including this one)—during the next big Apple keynote.

But even with a two-hour song and dance, Apple can’t show off everything that it’s working on. Not only because there’s simply not time, but also because not everything the company’s actively developing is ready for prime time. Some things just won’t make the cut, inevitably spawning a deluge of posts about “I can’t believe Apple didn’t show off [X]” or “No [Y]? Lame!” or the ever-popular “Apple is doooooomed.”

To read this article in full, please click here

Why iOS offloads apps and how to reinstall them

Macworld - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 07:00

Despite offering phones and tablets with ever-more onboard storage, Apple knows that people can still easily outpace available room as they download ever more apps and digital content for those apps. In iOS 11, Apple added an option to offload apps rather than just delete them as a compromise between apps you use and storage consumed.

IDG

An offloaded app sports a cloud download icon.

To read this article in full, please click here

Grace Digital Mondo+ Classic review: A neoclassical clock radio for the internet age

Macworld - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 06:00
Easy operation, modern connections, and agreeable sound make the Mondo+ Classic an internet radio even a Luddite can love.

Fitbit Inspire HR review: One size, many styles, fit all

Macworld - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 06:00

In a world of smartwatches and AI-infused earbuds, the Fitbit Inspire HR is decidedly old-school. It doesn’t have a color screen, a catalogue of apps, or an SpO2 sensor. You won’t be able to use it to buy coffee at Starbucks.

But there’s something refreshing about the Inspire HR’s base simplicity. Like the Alta HR it replaces, it’s a fitness band that tracks the bare essentials—steps, sleep, calories, distance—but it also brings a few tricks that you wouldn’t expect in a $100 device. And it has a sharp sense of style to boot.

To read this article in full, please click here

Trump grants William Barr full access to state secrets for review of Russian interference investigation

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 05:02

President Donald Trump has granted Attorney General William Barr “full and complete authority” to declassify government secrets, issuing a memorandum late on Thursday that orders US intelligence agencies to co-operate promptly with Barr’s audit of the investigation into Russia’s election interference in 2016.The president’s move gives General Barr broad powers to unveil carefully guarded intelligence secrets about the Russia investigation, which the attorney general requested to allow him to quickly carry out his review, according to the memo.“Today’s action will ensure that all Americans learn the truth about the events that occurred, and the actions that were taken, during the last presidential election and will restore confidence in our public institutions,” the White House said in an accompanying statement, which Mr Trump then tweeted.The president has labelled the investigation of his campaign a “political witch hunt”.His Republican allies in Congress who have reviewed some of the related files argue that the FBI investigation was opened based on flimsy and questionable evidence of wrongdoing, and that surveillance of campaign advisers to Mr Trump was improper.“This is candidly part of the president wanting to make sure the American people have the entire story of what went on and what will be construed by most people as improper activity within the FBI.It’s also the very first step in rectifying and repairing the damage done by certain people at the FBI,” said Mark Meadows, one of the president’s biggest defenders on Capitol Hill.Mr Meadows said he discussed with the president how granting General Barr this authority would provide answers about whether the investigation was biased.Conservative lawmakers, such as Mr Meadows, have insisted to friends in the administration that declassifying these documents will help Mr Trump protect his presidency and further distance himself from any political fallout from the Russia investigation, according to multiple people involved in those discussions.The move is likely to further anger Democrats who have said that Mr Barr is using his position as the nation’s top law enforcement official to aggressively protect the president and attack his critics.Adam Schiff, who as chairman of the House Intelligence Committee leads one of the ongoing congressional investigations of President Trump, called the action “un-American”.President Trump and Mr Barr, Mr Schiff said in a statement on Thursday night, are conspiring to “weaponise law enforcement and classified information against their political enemies”. ‬The president is the government’s highest authority over whether national secrets remain classified.His order gives Mr Barr significant authority over agencies that typically hold their secrets close and don’t declassify them easily.While the memo states Mr Barr should consult with the head of an agency before declassifying its secrets, it also demands that he get prompt responses and documents from the intelligence community.Jeremy Bash, a former chief of staff at the CIA during the Obama administration, warned that, with his directive, President Trump was entering “dangerous territory”.“Stripping the intelligence leaders of their ability to control information about sources and methods, and handing that power to political actors, could cause human agents to question whether their identity will be protected,” Mr Bash said.General Barr has tapped John Durham, the US attorney for the District of Connecticut, to investigate the origins of the Russia probe.Separately, the Justice Department inspector general is examining the handling of various aspects of the case. Mr Barr has said the inspector general’s work is expected to be completed in May or June.President Trump’s memo highlights how much he has grown to trust Mr Barr.Mr Barr has said “spying” was conducted by the government against the Trump campaign – an accusation Trump has levelled repeatedly but that current and former FBI officials have denied.Mr Barr has been criticised by former FBI director James Comey and other former law enforcement officials for using the phrase “spying” to discuss how investigators monitored some Trump campaign advisers who had extensive contacts with Russians.His critics argue that General Barr is parroting the president’s loaded wording, when surveillance was a proper part of a counterintelligence investigation looking at whether Russians were trying to influence Mr Trump’s campaign aides.The Washington Post


CORRECTED-London's FTSE gains, led by miners; Mothercare surges

Top Stories - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 03:39

Britain's main index firmed on Friday, helped by strong gains in mining heavyweights, while retailer Mothercare jumped after it reported a narrower annual loss and a lower debt burden. The FTSE 100 was 0.5% higher by 0720 GMT while more domestically-focused midcaps were up 0.6%. Mothercare was the standout across UK indexes, up 19.1% to be on course for its best day in a year after its annual report showed restructuring efforts were paying off.


McAleenan: We need to address issue of families crossing the border

Top Stories - Thu, 05/23/2019 - 22:28

Acting DHS Secretary Kevin McAleenan discusses the ongoing immigration crisis at the border on 'The Ingraham Angle.'


In new charges against Assange, groups see cause for concern

Top Stories - Thu, 05/23/2019 - 21:43

WASHINGTON (AP) — New charges filed against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange quickly drew alarm Thursday from media organizations and others. The groups are concerned that the Justice Department is charging Assange for actions that ordinary journalists do routinely in their jobs.


Pages

Subscribe to www.cafe52.com aggregator